Maraga suspends Kiambu magistrate in Waititu graft case for gross misconduct

CJ David Maraga and Kiambu Govenor Ferdinand Waititu.

Chief Justice David Maraga has suspended Kiambu Principal Magistrate Brian Khaemba after recently giving Governor Ferdinand Waititu Sh500,000 anticipatory bail orders.

Khaemba was suspended on Thursday for gross misconduct following recommendations by the Judicial Service Commission, the Nation reported.

An inquiry was launched after the magistrate, who was on sick leave showed up in court to only to handle the Waititu case.

“Mr Khaemba conducted himself in a manner likely to suggest that he has personal interest in the matter.

“It was public knowledge that Mr Khaemba was on sick leave as the same was announced to litigants during the morning briefing,” a letter from Maraga to Khaemba dated June 13 read.

“While on suspension, you shall receive nil salary. Your transfer to Thika Law Courts is hereby cancelled.

“You are therefore required to report to the Chief Magistrate, Kiambu Law Courts, every Friday.

Brian Khaemba.

“…You were required to explain why in the morning of May 23, whereas you had reported to be unwell and allowed to be away from duty thus necessitating the adjournment of all matters listed before you on that day, you went to court and handled only one matter that had not been allocated to or listed before you,” the letter reads.

Khaemba has been given 14 days to file a response failure to which disciplinary proceedings will be instituted against him.

Irregular tender payments

Waititu was accused by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) of irregularly awarding road tenders worth Sh588 million. The first-term governor was also accused of fraudulently acquiring public funds, money laundering and conflict of interest.

Three companies owned by Kiambu Governor Ferdinand Waititu, his wife Susan Wangari and their daughter Monica Njeri allegedly received kickbacks worth millions.

On Monday, Waititu’s entire cabinet was summoned by the anti-graft body to record statements.

 


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